Radon Entry into Buildings

Radon is a colorless, odorless naturally occurring gas that causes lung cancer.  In fact it is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States, and it is the number one cause of lung cancer in non-smokers.  Radon is estimated to be responsible for about 21,000 deaths in the United States annually.  Radon comes from the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water.  Many homes have radon entering the home through cracks and voids in the foundation (see the picture to the right).  The radon in your home’s indoor air can also come your water supply, especially if you have a private well.   Levels of radon can vary wildly from home to home, neighborhood to neighborhood and county to county. 

From the map below, many counties we serve are either in a Zone 1 or 2 which means many of the homes in those areas are at risk of having elevated levels of radon.  Since we cannot see, smell or taste radon the only way to find radon is by testing.   The EPA recommends that every home be tested for radon.  The EPA recommends that homes with a level of greater than 4 pCi/L be mitigated by a licensed radon mitigation company, homes that have less than 4 pCi/L should takes measures to reduce the levels of radon within the home.  

EPA Radon Zones by County for Ohio

Ohio EPA Radon Map - Erie County Huron County Ottawa County Lorain County Sandusky County

Radon Data

  Zone 1: Counties with predicted average indoor radon screening levels greater than 4 pCi/L
  Zone 2: Counties with predicted average indoor radon screening levels from 2 to 4 pCi/L
  Zone 3: Counties with predicted average indoor radon screening levels less than 2 pCi/L

 

 

 

Should you have your home tested?

  • If your thinking of buying a home you should have the home tested.
  • If your thinking of selling your home you should have the home tested. 
  • If your a home owner or tenant and want to know if radon is a problem in your home you should have the home tested.

We can help, call us today at 419-503-3644 so we can schedule your radon test.

For more information on radon, check out the EPA's website: